Bartlett Ninth Grade Academy

English Teacher Kelly Geer » Home:

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Hello Panther! Welcome to your first year in high school!!

 

My name is Kelly Geer and I teach English. I want to welcome you to the 2017-2018 school year at the Academy. I am so excited to be a part of the Bartlett family and I am looking forward to an awesome year. English I is an academic course that requires a passing grade to meet graduation requirements; it is a scholarly class that centers on empowered, student-centered learning. For these reasons, students are to maintain a scholarly and intellectual discourse when they are attending my class. This course is designed to be interactive, engaged, progressive, thoughtful, and a strong foundation to achieve optimal ACT/SAT preparation as well as ease for students transitioning into a rigorous high school environment.

 

My pedagogical approach is to create a space where scholars feel respected, valued, and seen in the context of their intellectual development. It is very important to me that my scholars are respectful, engaged, and prepared in their academic process. I encourage scholars to approach high school in a self-directed and thoughtful manner. Communication is paramount to the success of any healthy relationship and I encourage scholars to communicate with me all throughout the process to make sure they receive the support and encouragement they need to thrive.

 

I am a former professional ballerina and I have traveled extensively throughout the world. Ballet and travel are profound loves of mine and it has shaped me as an individual. The same level of commitment and integrity required to thrive as a ballerina is the same level of commitment and integrity I show to my scholars. I know together as a learning community we can accomplish our goals.

 

You will be issued your fabulous 1:1 device later in August. Once that has been issued you MUST bring it - charged - everyday. If you do not come into class prepared, you will swiftly fall behind. 

Please reach out to me with any questions or concerns. We are a team and we are in this together! I'm excited for a fantastic school year.
 
kgeer@bartlettschools.org

 

 

 

 

Recent Posts

English I, week of May 14th:

Week of May 14th:

Standards: RL.CS.9.4-6 (Craft and Structure); RL.KID.9.1-4 (Knowledge and Ideas); RL.IKI.9.7-9 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas); L.9.1-4 (Conventions of Standard English, Knowledge of Language, and Vocabulary Acquisition and Use); SL.9.1- 5 (Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas); W.9.1, 4, 9-10 (Argumentative Writing and Research to Build and Present Knowledge).

Monday:

Lesson: student-centered presentation of unit 10 vocabulary PowerPoint Presentations for a grade.

Target:

Vocabulary development for ACT prep and grade-level fluency.

Tuesday and Wednesday:

Lesson: Presentation of final To Kill a Mockingbird Project--Project-based learning—scholars will work collaboratively to synthesize their comprehension of To Kill a Mockingbird; the project will engage visual, auditory, and kinesthetic modalities of learning in the form of role-play, collage, and analysis of the most climactic scene of the novel.  

Tuesday: Scholars will begin presentations.

Wednesday: Scholars will complete presentations.

Target: Scholars will evaluate and synthesize their comprehension of To Kill a Mockingbird as a cohesive story of Racial Hypocrisy and the Loss of Innocence that comes with these types of injustices. Skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of text using a kinesthetic and visual medium.

Thursday and Friday:

Lesson: Study Guide Review for Final Exam.

Target:

Review of concepts taught in each literary unit to prepare for success on the final exam.

Due Dates:

Unit 10 Vocabulary PowerPoint Presentations are due Monday, May 7th; e-mail to kgeer@bartlettschools.org.

To Kill a Mockingbird Art Project due Tuesday, May 15th—Presentations will begin on the 15th for a final project grade!

Remember: Be Respectful, Be Engaged, and Be Prepared!!!!!!!

All the course resources, due dates, and blog questions are posted to Edmodo and the BCS website.

English I, week of May 7th:

Week of May 7th:

Standards: RL.CS.9.4-6 (Craft and Structure); RL.KID.9.1-4 (Knowledge and Ideas); RL.IKI.9.7-9 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas);  L.9.1-4 (Conventions of Standard English, Knowledge of Language, and Vocabulary Acquisition and Use); SL.9.1- 5 (Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas); W.9.1, 4, 9-10 (Argumentative Writing and Research to Build and Present Knowledge).

Monday:

Lesson: Student-centered discussion on the court trial of Tom Robinson and how class system in Maycomb County informs the outcome of the trial—scene where the African-American community is inclusive of the young Jem and Scout as well as when Jem and Scout sit with the African- American community in the balcony of the court house during the trial—symbolically suggests that the African-American community has an elevated sense of morality.

Discussion Points:

  • The symbolism of Jem & Scout sitting in the balcony of the court scene; they are sitting in closer proximity to God
  • Racial hypocrisy in the context of our judicial system

Core Content Reading: Chapters 26 to last chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Target:

Skill development in analysis of plot structure (character and conflict), setting, symbolism, motif(s), and theme.

Tuesday through Thursday:

Lesson: Project-based learning—scholars will work collaboratively to synthesize their comprehension of To Kill a Mockingbird; the project will engage visual, auditory, and kinesthetic modalities of learning in the form of role-play, collage, and analysis of the most climactic scene of the novel.  

Tuesday: Scholars will collaborate, brainstorm, and plan their projects.

Wednesday & Thursday: Scholars will execute their projects from the planning stage to the execution and completion phase—art supplies can be kept in the classroom, so bring colored pencils, paints, markers, and paper.  

Target: Scholars will evaluate and synthesize their comprehension of To Kill a Mockingbird as a cohesive story of Racial Hypocrisy and the Loss of Innocence that comes with these types of injustices. Skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of text using a kinesthetic and visual medium.

Friday:

Lesson: student-centered presentation of unit 10 vocabulary PowerPoint Presentations for a grade.

Target:

Vocabulary development for ACT prep and grade-level fluency.

Due Dates:

Unit 10 Vocabulary PowerPoint Presentations are due Monday, May 7th; e-mail to kgeer@bartlettschools.org.

Chapter 26 through final chapter due Thursday, May 10th!

To Kill a Mockingbird Art Project due Friday, May 11th!

Remember: Be Respectful, Be Engaged, and Be Prepared!!!!!!!

All the course resources, due dates, and blog questions are posted to Edmodo and the BCS website.

English I, week of April 30th:

Week of April 30th:

Standards: RL.KID. 1-4 (Knowledge and Ideas); L.9.1-4 (Conventions of Standard English, Knowledge of Language, and Vocabulary Acquisition and Use); SL.9.1- 5 (Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas); W.9.1, 4, 9-10 (Argumentative Writing and Research to Build and Present Knowledge).

Monday:

Lesson: Scholars will complete their reading quiz on chapters 12 through 14 of To Kill a Mockingbird; scholars will use quizlet.com to study for their unit 9 vocabulary quiz on Tuesday, May 1st!

Target:

Skill practice in analysis, synthesis, evaluation of text as well as vocabulary development for ACT-prep as well as grade-level core-content reading fluency.

Tuesday:

Lesson: Scholars will take their formal unit nine vocabulary quiz.

Target:

Vocabulary development for ACT-prep as well as grade-level core-content reading fluency.

Wednesday through Friday:

Lesson: Student-centered discussion on the contrast in the class system in Maycomb county and the moral class-system inclusive of  a contextual understanding of how race informs social caste system in the south in American in 1930s—scene where the African American community are inclusive of the young Jem and Scout as well as when Jem and Scout sit with the African- American community in the balcony of the court house during the trial—symbolically suggests that the African-American community has an elevated sense of morality.

Discussion Points:

  • Miss Maudie as a parallel character to Atticus Finch
  • The Mad Dog as symbolism
  • Aunt Alexandria as a composite character
  • Calpurnia takes Jem and Scout to her church; the African-American community are far more inclusive and egalitarian than the “white” community in Maycomb county. The African-American community as the moral superiors
  • The symbolism of Jem & Scout sitting in the balcony of the court scene; they are sitting in closer proximity to God

Core Content Reading: Chapters 20 through 25 of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Target:

Skill development in analysis of plot structure (character and conflict), setting, symbolism, motif(s), and theme.

Due Dates:

Finish Reading Schedule for To Kill a Mockingbird—brief reading quiz on Edulastic for comprehension check—Monday, April 30!

Chapter 20 through 25 due Thursday, May 3rd!

Formal Unit 9 Vocabulary Quiz is moved to Tuesday, May 1st!

Remember: Be Respectful, Be Engaged, and Be Prepared!!!!!!!

All the course resources, due dates, and blog questions are posted to Edmodo and the BCS website.

English I, week of April 23rd:

Week of April 23rd:

Standards: RL.KID. 1-4 (Knowledge and Ideas); L.9.1-4 (Conventions of Standard English, Knowledge of Language, and Vocabulary Acquisition and Use); SL.9.1- 5 (Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas); W.9.1, 4, 9-10 (Argumentative Writing and Research to Build and Present Knowledge)

Dear Students of English I,

Monday:

Lesson:  EOC Testing for Algebra; Reading Assessment—Chapters one through fourteen of To Kill a Mockingbird. Film version of To Kill a Mockingbird (through the court trial).

Target:

Analysis of setting, social class, and character analysis and how it informs plot structure and major conflicts in the text.

Tuesday: EOC Testing continued; teacher-directed discussion of symbolism of the mad dog.

Target:

Skill practice in analysis, synthesis, evaluation of text.

Wednesday and Thursday:

Thursday:

Lesson: EOC Testing continued….; student-centered discussion on the contrast in the class system in Maycomb county and the moral class-system inclusive of  a contextual understanding of how race informs social caste system in the south in American in 1930s—scene where the African American community are inclusive of the young Jem and Scout as well as when Jem and Scout sit with the African- American community in the balcony of the court house during the trial—symbolically suggests that the African-American community has an elevated sense of morality.

Discussion Points:

  • Miss Maudie as a parallel character to Atticus Finch
  • The Mad Dog as symbolism
  • Aunt Alexandria as a composite character
  • Calpurnia takes Jem and Scout to her church; the African-American community are far more inclusive and egalitarian than the “white” community in Maycomb county. The African-American community as the moral superiors
  • The symbolism of Jem & Scout sitting in the balcony of the court scene; they are sitting in closer proximity to God

Core Content Reading: Chapters 14 through 20 of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Target:

Skill development in analysis of plot structure (character and conflict), setting, and symbolism.

Friday:

Lesson: Scholars will take their formal unit nine vocabulary quiz.

Target:

Vocabulary development for ACT-prep as well as grade-level core-content reading fluency.

Due Dates:

Reading Schedule for To Kill a Mockingbird—brief reading quiz on Edulastic for comprehension check—Monday, April 23rd!

Chapter 14 through 20 due Thursday, April 26th!

Formal Unit 9 Vocabulary Quiz is moved to Friday, April 27th!

Remember: Be Respectful, Be Engaged, and Be Prepared!!!!!!!

All the course resources, due dates, and blog questions are posted to Edmodo and the BCS we

English I, week of April 16th:

Week of April 16th:

Standards: RL.KID. 1-4 (Knowledge and Ideas); RI.9.1-3 (Key Ideas and Details); RI.9.4-6 (Craft and Structure); RI.9.7-9 (Integration of Ideas); L.9.1-4 (Conventions of Standard English, Knowledge of Language, and Vocabulary Acquisition and Use); SL.9.1- 5 (Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas); W.9.1, 4, 9-10 (Argumentative Writing and Research to Build and Present Knowledge)

Dear Students of English I,

Monday:

Lesson:  EOC Testing for English; teacher-directed presentation on how Scout’s character is crafted as a moral reflection of her father.

Target:

Skill practice in analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of text.

Tuesday and Wednesday:

Lesson: EOC Testing for English; scholars will explore pivotal moments in character development of our narrative Scout—how does Scout’s sense of morality and justice reflect much of the societal hypocrisy?  Discussion on perspective and how Scout’s perspective lens greater insight into the themes of appearance versus reality, and social injustice.

Target:

Analysis of setting, social class, and character analysis and how it informs plot structure and major conflicts in the text.

Thursday:

Lesson: EOC Testing continued….; student-centered discussion on the contrast in the class system in Maycomb county and the moral class-system inclusive of  a contextual understanding of how race informs social caste system in the south in American in 1930s—scene where the African American community are inclusive of the young Jem and Scout as well as when Jem and Scout sit with the African- American community in the balcony of the court house during the trial—symbolically suggests that the African-American community has an elevated sense of morality. .   

Core Content Reading: Chapters nine through fourteen of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Target:

Skill development in analysis of plot structure (character and conflict), setting, and symbolism.

Friday: Film version of To Kill a Mockingbird (through the first 14 chapters).

Target:

Synthesis of core-content reading!

Due Dates:

Reading Schedule for To Kill a Mockingbird—brief reading quiz on Edulastic for comprehension check:

Chapter nine through fourteen due Thursday, April 19th.

Formal Unit 9 Vocabulary Quiz is moved to Friday, April 27th!

Remember: Be Respectful, Be Engaged, and Be Prepared!!!!!!!

All the course resources, due dates, and blog questions are posted to Edmodo and the BCS website.